Weekly Web Harvest for 2019-10-27

This post was originally published on Bionic Teaching http://bionicteaching.com/weekly-web-harvest-for-2019-10-27/ on November 3rd 2019.

Zeno – Oriental Coins Database – Part of the mirror, unearthed in Kyrgyzstanchallenging text or word focused pattern poetry Vortimo – Beta3Vortimo is software that organizes information on webpages that you’ve visited. It records pages you go to, extracts data from it and enrich the data that was extracted. It augments the pages in your browser by allowing you to tag objects as well as decorating objects it deems important. It then arranges the data in an UI. Vortimo support switching between cases/projects seamlessly. You can also generate PDF reports based on the aggregated information and meta information. Quiet.js by quietThis is a javascript binding for libquiet, a library for sending and receiving data via sound card. It can function either via speaker or cable (e.g., 3.5mm). Quiet comes included with a few transmissions profiles which can be selected for the intended use. For speaker transmission, there is a profile which transmits around the 19kHz range, which is essentially imperceptible to the human ear. –nefarious and amusing possibilities espec. w arg White House cybersecurity adviser Giuliani took his iPhone to the Genius Bar when he forgot his password / Boing Boingindicative of so much 3D Configurators – Sketchfabsee this video too https://twitter.com/Sketchfab/status/1189255798003785728 navio | A d3 visualization widget to help summarizing, exploring and navigating large network visualizations Digital Wellbeing Experiments […]

8 Tools Every Podcast Website Must Have In 2019

This post was originally published on BloggingPro https://www.bloggingpro.com/archives/2019/09/11/tools-every-podcast-website-must-have/ on September 11th 2019.

Unbeknownst to most of you is that podcasters actually work harder than most radio announcers and programs. Whereas radios are usually done live and in real-time, podcasts need to be edited (some of them at least). Beyond that, there’s a certain level of quality to maintain. Hence, for every budding podcaster, some online tools for […]

What’s your podcast about?

This post was originally published on Seth Godin’s Blog https://seths.blog/2019/08/whats-your-podcast-about/ on August 6th 2019.

This is the moment, right here and right now, to start your podcast. Not because it will make you rich. Hardly. There are too many other ways for people to spend their attention for you (or me) to possibly assemble a large enough audience to make a killing selling ads. There are three good reasons […]

Innocence lost: What did you do before the internet?

This post was originally published on Internet | The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/aug/04/innocence-lost-what-did-you-do-before-the-internet on August 4th 2019.

People born in the late 1970s are the last to have grown up without the internet. Social scientists call them the Last of the Innocents. Leah McLaren ponders a time when our attention was allowed to wanderIn moments of digital anxiety I find myself thinking of my father’s desk. Dad was a travelling furniture salesman in the 1980s, a job that served him well in the years before globalisation hobbled the Canadian manufacturing sector. He was out on the road a lot, but when he worked from home he sat in his office, a small windowless study dominated by a large teak desk. There wasn’t much on it – synthetic upholstery swatches, a mug of pens, a lamp, a phone, an ashtray. And yet every day Dad spent hours there, making notes, smoking Craven “A”s, drinking coffee and yakking affably to small-town retailers about shipments of sectional sofas and dinette sets. This is what I find so amazing. That my father – like most other professionals of his generation and generations before him – was able to earn a salary and support our family with little more than a phone and a stack of papers. Just thinking of his desk, the emptiness of it, induces in me a strange disorientation and loneliness. How did he sit there all day, I wonder, without the internet to keep him company?In this age of uncertainty, predictions have lost value, but here’s an irrefutable one: quite soon, no person on earth will remember what the world was like before the internet. There will be records, of course (stored in the intangibly limitless archive of the cloud), but the actual lived experience of what it was like to think and feel and be human before the emergence of big data will be gone. When that happens, what will be lost?We are the last of a dying breed who knew days of nothingIt was in those lost hours that we really got to know ourselves Continue reading…

Can people be pushed into #mandatory #learning? Old myths in new mantra’s #learning #pedagogy #instruction

This post was originally published on @Ignatia Webs http://ignatiawebs.blogspot.com/2019/06/can-people-be-pushed-into-mandatory.html on June 24th 2019.

Let’s be clear: teachers still are not transforming into guides-on-the-side, contemporary-online-learning is not a fabulous learning utopia (we can build it, but we lack whom we want to reach) and pedagogy is now debilitated through new innovations in learning. At least that is my frustration of the day. Let me explain (picture credit: PhD comics.com).As I am getting more into the ‘AI helps people to be trained in a personalized way’-project (officially called the skills3.0 project, slides here), I am starting to feel uncomfortable with some of the ideas that emerge and resonate with false assumptions found 20 years ago:the old elearning assumption: if you build it, people will come (they did not, at best you need to market it ferociously in order to attract some worldwide learners – confer MOOCs). But when looking at the numbers and the degrees, it is still rather weak in terms of successful tailored learning resulting in professional learning enhancement. In most cases, MOOCs cover the basics, not the advanced side of professional topics.  another one: having to transform instructors (defined as sage-on-the-stage) to guides-on-the-side (something which is repeated by Norris Krueger in his blog article ‘from instructor to educator’ with a focus on entrepreneurial education). This idea of guide on the side stems from 1981, which means in the last 38 years we haven’t managed to get there… this does show it is hard to expand people to embrace a different approach to learning. For in my opinion the best teachers have always been guides-on-the-side, they inspire their students and lift them to their own next level.  The debilitation of pedagogy: I cannot get around this tendency to oversimplify learning, and almost dismiss the proven, evidence-based pedagogy we – the learning researchers – established over the last 30 years. For years fellow researchers in online learning were testing, investigating, reiterating learning options, to see what worked best. And as soon as the market took over, all is reduced to …. classic courses, with one speaker who delivers knowledge but barely listens, clearly a sage-on-the-stage model (MOOCs) and all of us learners discussing and sharing knowledge with each other in the discussion areas in order to tailor what was said to our own situations (social learning, which actually happens in face-to-face courses as well). The only thing that is added to the sage-on-the-stage in most of the MOOC cases is ‘fancy video’ and a ‘new type of Learning Management System’ (cfr. Coursera, FutureLearn, EdX… they are basically LMS’s with some extra’s). Yes, some people learn from the hole in the wall, some do, but most of us don’t. So why do learning data scientist and innovators in their new learning tools think that all of humanity will start to learn simply because they say: here it is, this will get you in a better career position. And even if this would be the case, please tell me who would have these actual magic courses, for who can build courses at the speed of the emerging, changing industry? And if we build them, who will be waiting, filled with anticipation and willingness to follow these courses?I feel frustrated that learning is again be seen as simply a thing that all of us do, and for industry-related reasons. Honestly, I think most of us learn informally (proven!) and if we learn for professional reasons we need to be able to spend time on it (HR enabling time), and if we were to be allocated time to learn, it should be allocated in terms of our own capacity for learning, based on our own background in learning (using a holistic approach to pedagogies). In order to move forward with the Skills3.0 project, there are several elements that need to come together and make sense in order to scale the project as well. These elements are:Using AI to filter out industry needs (which means you look at all the reports from industry, and analyse which new concepts arise from these reports to predict where the industry is going)Using AI to analyse which true experiences (and related competencies and skills) a person has: based on LinkedIn profiles, current CV’s…Finding the skills gap between both previous steps: getting to know what people might be missing in order for them to answer to upcoming industry needs,And finally pointing them to training/courses/workshops that might push them to be better for the future jobs. The project is taking off (see movie at the end, to see where we are at, I look a bit tired in it, or maybe simply older).The last step is underestimated by most of the non-educational people. At present learning cannot be put into simple formula’s, it is the complexity of life itself, it is why everything evolves in the long and in the short term, including us humans.  All of the above steps of the Skills3.0 project are laudable. If this works, it has a broader societal meaning, you can even say it provides a way to direct people to a more fulfilling professional life. But… that feels like a Utopian emotion following new innovations. We can see how providing guidance to courses that will help each one of us to perform better, to enhance our careers, to find new professional challenges, … is a good thing. The only problem is, that humans are also bound to their own learning characteristics (e.g. Big five personality traits, or more academically the learner characteristics guiding their own self-directed learning).Simply providing courses might not be enough, we need coaching, workshops, orientational sessions which depict which types of learning will benefit you most (e.g. if we look for data science courses online, which ones are useful to each of us individually? that will depend on what we know, where we want to use them for, and how we learn (for me, numbers are a challenge)).Whether we say learners must self-direct, or self-regulate or self-determine their learning, inevitably this means we are talking about learners that are willing to learn, and are capable of learning. Indeed, in the near future we will ask learners to learn at a speed that is ever increasing, meaning you need to be a really good learner to keep up with your own changing field. Can we do this? And if we can, how does it work?Short video on the Skills3.0 project recorded during the WindEurope conference in Bilbao. Which will lead to ‘building the workforce’: